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A sneak peek of what’s in store at the Supersale Bazaar in Rockwell, July 15-17, 2011

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These journals will be available first at the Supersale Bazaar in Rockwell, July 15-17. Please drop by our booth, Booth 06, located near the entrance. See you there!

We’re also on Facebook!

Please visit our Facebook fanpage, www.facebook.com/Alunsina.Handbound.Books, for our latest designs!

Handbound Leather Journals

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These are journals that we custom-made for a friend, with more complicated stitches and embellishments compared to previously released leather journals.

size: 7.5 x 5.5 inches
cover: brown distressed leather
pages: white sketchpaper; 160 pages back to back
binding: long stitch, non-adhesive

If you want to order, pls email filled out order form to alunsinahandboundbooks@yahoo.com or add me up on Facebook (Nadja Castillo, nadj.enan@gmail.com) and send me a PM.

Order Form
Name:
Contact Nos:
Email address:
Shipping Address:
Order description:

Sample Book With Cover #26

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Cover #26 in “Fabric Swabs (Choose Your Book Covers Here)” Page

26. With Batik 7 Cover:

112 pages (sketchpaper) back-to-back

*brown patterns on photos are colored gold on actual fabric and book.

More T’nalak Covers

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For regular-sized journals/sketchbooks only

112 pages (sketchpaper) back-to-back

T’nalak Covers now available

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Here is a sample T’nalak Book with a velcro lock.

Description: Yellow- and blue-colored T’nalak cover, 112 pages (sketchpaper) back to back, coptic-bound

Other T’nalak patterns/colors available on this link:

https://alunsinahandboundbooks.wordpress.com/2010/10/23/tnalak-for-book-covers-available-soon/

Yakan tribe hand-woven fabric now available

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This particular hand-woven design is called bunga-sama (Python Pattern). The amount of material available is good for only two regular-sized journals/sketchbooks, so place your order now!

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The Yakan are one of the 13 Moro groups in the Philippines. They mainly reside in Basilan.

The Yakans are the traditional settlers of Basilan Island in the Southern Philippines, situated to the west of Zamboanga in Mindanao. It is said that their typical physical characteristics are strikingly different when compared to the other ethnic Filipino groups (relatively high-bridged noses and tall stature). Traditionally they wear colorful, handwoven clothes. The women wear tightfitting short blouses and both sexes wear narrowcut pants resembling breeches. The women covers it partly with a wrap-around material while the man wraps a sash-like cloth around the waist where he places his weapon – usually a long knife. Nowadays most Yakans wear western clothes and use their traditional clothes only for special festivals.

In the early seventies, some of the Yakan settled in Zamboanga City due to political unrest which led the armed conflicts between the militant Muslims and government solders. The Yakan Village in Upper Calarian is famous among local and foreign tourists because of their art of weaving. Traditionally, they have used plants like pineapple and abaca converted into fibers as basic material for weaving. Using herbal extracts from leaves, roots and barks, the Yakans dyed the fibers and produced colorful combinations and intricate designs.

The seputangan is the most intricate design worn by the women around their waist or as a head cloth. The palipattang is patterned after the color of the rainbow while the bunga-sama, after the python. Almost every Yakan fabric can be described as unique since the finished materials are not exactly identical. Differences may be seen in the pattern or in the design or in the distribution of colors.

From <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakan>